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Your Expert Guide to Public Relations Careers

Deirdre O'Donoghue
Deirdre O'Donoghue  |  May 28, 2019

Make public relations work for you.

Because the public relations industry is so vast, there are many job titles one can hold after earning a public relations degree. The good news about looking for a job in public relations is that it’s likely that someone has already been in your situation.

Whether you’re newly graduated, stuck in a job you hate, or on the prowl for a new gig, there is something in PR out there for you.

If only there were a functional Tinder for the job hunt. Until someone creates that platform, I’m here to tell you all the public relations jobs you can explore. Then, once you’ve been inspired, you can check out expert tips from our rockstar PR pros.

If you’re here for the expert tips, feel free to jump ahead to 10 tips on breaking into public relations

Types of public relations jobs

I’ve gathered 50 job titles for people with a public relations degree. Every company needs to maintain a public image for success so you can be a little picky when on your job hunt depending on your interests.

  1. Public relations intern
  2. Public relations assistant
  3. Public relations coordinator
  4. Public relations associate
  5. Public relations specialist
  6. Public relations manager
  7. Public relations director
  8. Content creator
  9. Content strategist
  10. Content manager
  11. Public affairs specialist
  12. Public affairs manager
  13. Public affairs director
  14. Editor
  15. Event coordinator
  16. Event manager
  17. Program coordinator
  18. Public information assistant
  19. Public information officer
  20. Public information specialist
  21. Media director
  22. Relationship manager
  23. Social media analyst
  24. Social media specialist
  25. Social media manager
  26. Media relations
  27. Community relations
  28. Financial communications
  29. Spokesperson
  30. Crisis manager
  31. Lobbyist
  32. Publicist
  33. Copywriter
  34. Reputation manager
  35. Fundraising manager
  36. Crisis manager
  37. Brand ambassador
  38. Account director
  39. Account executive
  40. Account manager
  41. Account supervisor
  42. Communications coordinator
  43. Communications director
  44. Communications editor
  45. Communications representative
  46. Communications specialist
  47. Marketing associate
  48. Marketing coordinator
  49. Marketing director
  50. Marketing officer

Get 30+ public relations resources, FREE.    Explore →

10 tips on breaking into public relations

Crafting your PR resume is an obvious first step when applying to jobs. But what else helps you land your dream gig? These expert tips will help you launch your public relations career.

Use your PR skills

Quote on using your PR skills

“Pitch yourself! If you are looking to get into PR, show your pitching skills by convincing an employer to hire you the same way you might pitch a reporter on a story. Get creative! Use a subject line that will get them to click. Draft an email that sucks them in early. And explain! Tell them how you went about deciding to pitch yourself the way that you did. What was your strategy and how will you bring that same energy to one of their biggest clients.

- ”Sarah Segal, Co-founder at Voorhees Segal Communications

Proofread more than once

“NO TYPOS on your resume or email, we are professional communicators, show us you care and you aren’t someone who barely graduated. I don’t want to have an editor for your work, I want it to reflect someone who has spent time learning the professional part of PR, good writing is PR!”

- Emily Reynolds, Founder of R PR Firm 

Further your education

“ Attending PR boot camps or other educational events works well. You'll get knowledge, contacts, and most likely job opportunities as agencies are often participating/sponsoring such events. Very often they are on a lookout for new talents. You might not get your job on the very first event, but it will help you to polish your competencies. Be persistent and make sure to be proactive as just being in the room doesn’t help to get things done.”

- Vera Mayuk, Head of Public Relations at bpm’online

Network

"It's not what you know, it's who you know. Network as much as you can, take people out to lunch/coffee/drinks, volunteer and offer pro bono work in the beginning and be a resource. Look into how you can use social media, are you following key players on Twitter, Instagram and have you joined all of the relevant Facebook groups? Lastly, join some professional organizations such as PRSA, Common Wealth Club and Churchill Club.”

- Erin Lumley, Partner at Ingrid Marketing

Be yourself

quote on being yourself

“First and foremost, be authentic and don’t be shy about touting your special skills or talents. If you’re bilingual, multilingual, have amazing organizational skills or have a special gift for analytics and research, ensure potential employers are acutely aware of what may set you apart from your competition.”

- Marco Antonio Gonzalez, VP of Public Relations and Corporate Affairs at LBI Media/EstrellaTV 

Analyze the job description

“I recommend that applicants compare their skills to specific aspects of the job description to identify transferable skills. What skills are the most transferable — and thus the best to highlight — will depend on the role and the industry it serves. For example, our agency writes content on behalf of our B2B SaaS clients, so experience writing for B2B or technology companies would make a candidate stand out. On the other hand, a consumer brand looking for someone to handle internal communication might not weigh that experience as highly.”

- Anna Julow Roolf, VP of Talent Acquisition at BLASTmedia 

Prove yourself

“The best way to get a job in PR is to achieve results, so you can show examples of actual achievements worth paying for.”

Krystal Covington, Corporate Communications and Marketing Consultant at GO Lead,

Write. Write. Write.

“In order to stand out from other applicants, the most important skill a PR Practitioner must have is their ability to write and communicate. Every company/client has detailed messaging, a goal and/or a call-to-action that a PR practitioner must convey in a confident and concise manner when pitching media for coverage, writing press releases, creating content for publication, etc.”

- Alex Petrucelli, PR Manager at EGC Group

Stay current

quote on staying current

“Today, PR professionals need to be tech savvy (have experience working with the latest apps and automation platforms) and know how beneficial link building is. In today's digital world, it's essential to write quality content that people want to share, which ultimately brings traffic back to your site. In an interview, show how you plan to use data to create relevant digital PR campaigns rather than "hoping" that certain ideas work out. Show how you will make them work!”

- Ashton Meisner, Media Relations and Marketing Manager at Directive 

Customize your communication

“When applying to a specific agency, please do your research and customize your intro email so the person receiving the email understands that you know a bit about the PR firm and its client base.”

- Diana Bianchini, Founder and President at Di Moda Public Relations

You got this!

Prepare for the worst and expect the best. Go into your interviews with confidence, and apply these tips to ensure a successful career in public relations. 


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Deirdre O'Donoghue
Author

Deirdre O'Donoghue

Deirdre O’Donoghue is a Senior Content Marketing Specialist at G2. She brings her passion for research and creativity to her writing. In her free time you can find Deirdre fostering puppies or exploring the Chicago foodie scene. (she/her/hers)