26 Nonprofit Statistics That Show Generosity Is on the Rise

Lauren Pope
Lauren Pope  |  July 17, 2019

Can’t find a comprehensive nonprofit statistics round-up? What gives?

Or maybe the real question should be, who gives? No matter what burning questions you have about nonprofits, this statistics round-up has the answers. We’ve collected high-level data points covering everything from who is giving, how much they’re giving, and where they are giving.

Looking for information about a specific area of nonprofits or fundraising? Use the links below to jump ahead:

Nonprofit growth statistics

If you’re looking for a bright spot or some good news, look no further than these statistics about nonprofit growth. While it does seem that the number of individual donors is down, the amount of money being poured into nonprofits remains on the rise.

  • The nonprofit sector contributed an estimated $985.4 billion to the US economy in 2015, composing 5.4% of the country's gross domestic product. (NCCS, 2018)
  • Giving to the arts was the second-fastest growing subsection with an 8.7% increase over the 2017. (GivingUSA, 2018)
nonprofit stats
 
  • Disaster relief donations are up by more than 300% in terms of median cash giving in the last three years, from $212,000 in 2015 to $862,000 in 2017. (CECP, 2018)
  • From 2005 to 2015, the number of nonprofit organizations registered with the IRS rose from 1.41 million to 1.56 million, an increase of 10.4%. (NCCS, 2018)

Individual giving statistics

While individual giving overall is down, we’re seeing newer demographics getting involved in charitable donations. This is a good sign for the future of charitable giving and nonprofits overall.

  • The average donor in the United States is 64 years old and makes two charitable gifts a year. (Double the Donation, 2019)
  • 60% of millennials donate an average of $481 to nonprofits each year. (QGiv, 2019)

stats about millenials

  • 45% of donors give to nonprofits located outside of their country of residence. (Global Trends in Giving Report, 2018)
  • Individuals that earn $25,000 or less donate the largest share (16.6%) of their income to charity. (QGiv, 2019)
  • 31% of worldwide donors give to organizations located outside of their country of residence. (Double the Donation, 2019)
  • The average American supports 4.5 charities. (QGiv, 2019)

Nonprofit financial statistics

Just how much money is being poured into nonprofits annually? These statistics show the value behind donations and individual contributions. The health of the nonprofit sector looks great with numbers like these behind it.

  • Private charitable contributions reached an estimated $410.02 billion in 2017. (NCCS, 2018)
  • Of the nonprofit organizations registered with the IRS, 501(c)(3) public charities accounted for just over three-quarters of revenue and expenses for the nonprofit sector as a whole ($1.98 trillion and $1.84 trillion, respectively). (NCCS, 2018)
  • Giving through legacy giving increased by 2.3% to $35.70 billion (9% of all donations). (Charity Navigator, 2017)
legacy giving
 
  • Foundations - which includes grants made by independent, community, and operating foundations - gave $66.9 billion (16% of all donations). This represents a 6% increase over the previous year. (Charity Navigator, 2017)

Volunteering statistics

There’s more to supporting nonprofits than just writing a check. Volunteers provide the manpower to help accomplish nonprofit goals and missions.

  • An estimated 25.1%of US adults volunteered in 2017, contributing an estimated 8.8 billion hours. This is a 1.6%increase from 2016. The value of these hours is approximately $195 billion. (NCCS, 2018)
  • 66% of donors have volunteered within the last 12 months. 85% donated to the nonprofit that they volunteered for. (Global Trends in Giving Report, 2018)
volunteering statistics
 
  • The median number of total volunteer hours (on-company and outside-company time) increased between 2015 and 2017 from 69,000 to 90,000, which represents a growth rate of 30%. (CECP, 2018)
  • Individuals between the ages of 35 and 54 are the most likely to volunteer their time. (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2016)
  • Volunteer work is worth on average $24.14 an hour. (Independent Sector Study, 2017)
  • Volunteers are almost twice as likely to donate to a charity than those that don’t volunteer. (The Corporation for National & Community Service, 2019)

Online fundraising statistics

The latest trend in fundraising is using digital marketing and social media platforms to reach donors. Think this trend is a passing phase? Maybe these stats about online fundraising will change your mind.

  • Email has the highest return on investment of any marketing channel ($40 for every dollar spent!). (QGiv, 2019)
  • Female donors are more likely to donate because of social media marketing, while male donors are more likely to give because of email messages. (Double the Donation, 2019)
  • On average, nonprofits raise 7.6% of their total revenue online. (Nonprofit Tech For Good, 2018)
online donation stats
 
  • 30% of online giving occurs in December with 10% in the last three days of the year. (Network For Good, 2018)
  • Online resources are considered 20% more useful than direct mail when it comes to influencing donors. (QGiv, 2019)
  • For every 1,000 website visitors, a nonprofit raises $612. (QGiv, 2019)

Give it up for generosity!

Despite what conventional thinking might have you believe, generosity is on the rise. The next time someone asks if nonprofits have the impact today that they used to, show them these statistics to help change their mind.

Or better yet, download our free nonprofit stats one-sheeter and give them something to think about!

FREE RESOURCE: Nonprofit Stats One-Sheet Download Template Now →

 

Lauren Pope
Author

Lauren Pope

Lauren is a Senior Content Specialist at G2 with five years of content marketing experience. You can find her work featured on CNBC, Yahoo Finance, and on the G2 Learning Hub. In her free time, Lauren enjoys listening to podcasts, watching true crime shows, and spending time in the Chicago karaoke scene.