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The Many Benefits of Freelancing

Grace Pinegar
Grace Pinegar  |  July 23, 2019

The stability of a 9 to 5 is necessary for some.

Going into an office every day and working for a steady income has many advantages. However, it’s important to note that the traditional 9 to 5 is not a professional’s only option.

Freelancing (see: freelance definition) is a growing trend, especially within the United States and parts of Europe. But what’s so great about it that people are willing to set aside the perks of free office snacks and unlimited Keurig coffee?

Let’s discuss the benefits of becoming a freelancer.

Benefits of freelancing

To familiarize yourself with the concept, be sure to catch up on what is freelancing, as well as the freelancing definition.

Tip: Want to start a career as a freelancer? Be sure to get on a freelance platform.

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The following list outlines some of the many benefits of being a freelancer:

Flexibility

Freelancers know how much work they can get done in what amount of time. This means they’re able to create their own schedules. This is especially helpful for freelancers who have kids or pets that might need care during the day.

Freelancers can put themselves on a typical 9 to 5 shift, or they could choose to work only on nights and weekends.

Autonomy over your work

Freelancers have the divine freedom to say yes or no to certain projects and clients. At an agency, an employee might be assigned a client that they had no choice but to work with. Freelancers don’t suffer from the same obligation.

If a client turns out to be particularly fussy or unrealistic, a freelancer can choose simply to never work with them again. Also, freelancers are not beholden to a company, so they can even deny clients based on personal or moral reasons.

Not tied to one location

With the increase of freelancers, especially freelance writers (what is freelance writing?), the remote workforce is growing. One benefit that comes with this is the ability to live anywhere, as opposed to staying local to where you work.

Benefits of Freelancing

Take me for example. While I’m not a freelancer, I am a remote employee for G2. While their headquarters are in Chicago, I live and work out of my home in New York City.

Many freelancers leave the security of office life because they are simply tired of, or unable to, remain centrally located to the office.

Self-employed

Freelancers are self-employed, meaning there is no manager looming over their shoulder, making sure all work is done in a timely manner. Freelancers act as their own boss, finding their own clientele, doing the work, and sending invoices for payments.

The freedom of being able to control your own work and quality of work is an attractive prospect to many people.

Decide your own income

Freelancers have the freedom to decide what their work is worth. While the price might start out low, especially for beginners, rates can rise over time. This is a very attractive concept to many. Deciding your own income means never working for less than what your time is worth.

Freelancers do have the responsibility of pricing their rates reasonably, however. If a freelancer shoots too high, they may find it hard to book and retain clients.

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Freelance freedom

As you can see, the benefits of freelancing all boils down to one thing: freedom. Those who pursue this career are taking on many difficulties, but with the benefit of knowing they are the only person who gets to tell them what to do.

Want to learn more about freelancing? Check out independent contractors vs employees.

Grace Pinegar
Author

Grace Pinegar

Grace Pinegar is a lifelong storyteller with an extensive background in various forms such as acting, journalism, improv, research, and now content marketing. She was raised in Texas, educated in Missouri, and has come to tolerate, if not enjoy, the opposition of Chicago's seasons. (she/her/hers)